Jun 20 2011

Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and Dassault Systèmes’ Giza Archives Project Receives Computerworld 2011 Honors

First of a Kind Project Linking Archival, Archaeological Data in a Real-Time 3D Interactive Environment Enables Scientific Community and Public to Experience Virtual Archaeology

LOWELL, Mass., June 20, 2011 – Dassault Systèmes (Euronext Paris: #13065, DSY.PA), a world leader in 3D and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions, announced today that the Giza Archives Project at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (MFA), was selected by the IDG Computerworld Honors Program as a 2011 Laureate.  The annual award program taking place tonight in Washington, D.C. honors visionary applications of information technology promoting positive social, economic and educational change.

The Giza Archives Project is a digital initiative, housed at the MFA, for research on the Egyptian Pyramids and surrounding tombs at the Giza Plateau.  The Giza Pyramids arguably represent the world's most famous archaeological site, with thousands of tombs, temples, ancient artifacts and artistic masterpieces.  Dassault Systèmes provides the Giza Archives Project with its real-time 3D expertise and a complete suite of solutions for simulation and visualization of archeological data, creating fully immersive interactive experiences for both specialists and the general public.

“While there are other archaeological projects that are processing old archives, and still others engaged in reconstructing ancient landscapes and structures via 3D computer technology, only the Giza Archives Project is combining both approaches, linking archival archaeological data in a real-time 3D interactive environment to allow for an entirely new way to experience the Giza Necropolis.  And unlike a video game, the 3D reconstructions are based on actual archaeological data,” said Peter Der Manuelian, Giza Archives project director and Philip J. King professor of Egyptology at Harvard University.  “Bringing together real archaeological data and real-time 3D graphics creates a new paradigm for how to manage archival information and disseminate it across multiple media platforms for research, education, and public outreach," said Rus Gant, technology consultant, Giza Archives project.

In addition to the clear benefits that 3D technology and simulation tools bring to the field of archaeological research, Dassault Systèmes and the MFA are working together to invent innovative education approaches and new ways to communicate with the general public.

“Along with the online application, we are building multi-platform experiences, whether individual or collective, through virtual and augmented reality systems, 3D screens or movie theaters, allowing us to display this experience in museums or even classrooms,” said Karine Guilbert, Giza 3D project director, Dassault Systèmes.


“It is a great honor to be recognized alongside the Museum of Fine Arts for the Giza Archives Project, largely because everyone involved in the project feels so strongly about the benefit of this work to researchers, educators and students around the world,” said Al Bunshaft, managing director of Dassault Systèmes North America. “Technology can have a significant impact on enhancing understanding, and this project is living proof of that.”

“The number and quality of nominations this year were very inspiring and demonstrate how valuable IT is to community change,” said John Amato, publisher, Computerworld. “Computerworld is very proud to name the 2011 class of Laureates and showcase their initiatives benefiting society through innovative uses of IT.”

The 2011 Computerworld Honors awards will be presented at the Annual Laureates Medal Ceremony & Gala Awards on June 20, 2011, at the Andrew W. Mellon Auditorium in Washington, D.C.  For more information, visit http://events.computerworld.com/Honors2011.

For more information on the Giza 3D Project: www.3ds.com/giza3D.

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