Oct 19 2006

Dassault Systèmes Promotes Eco Design

“Light Objects,” competition for sustainable development

Paris, France – October 19, 2006 –Dassault Systèmes (DS) (Nasdaq: DASTY; Euronext Paris: #13065, DSY.PA), a world leader in 3D and Product Lifecycle Management (PLM) solutions, today announced the winners of its eco design contest, “Light Objects,” launched to encourage manufacturers to design environmentally friendly products. DS realized virtual prototypes of the winning entries using CATIA V5.

Participants had to promote the notion of lightness in every way, from material selection, energy usage, security and ergonomics to final recycling. The winning contestant conceived a product named “Pulse” whose sole function consists of streamlining energy use. Daniel Sutherland, the UK creator explains, “Millions of pounds are lost every year by leaving a product on standby. Pulse is designed to identify products in our homes that are not being used and should be switched off to save energy.” Through usage, Pulse teaches consumers to manage and optimize their energy at home.

The first runner-up, Andres Roppa from Uruguay, designed a biodegradable toothbrush. Manufactured from corn or potato starch, the product has a closed lifecycle and disintegrates upon over-usage. Waste is minimal as all graphics and instructions are embossed on the brush itself. The second runner-up conceived a parasol, which charges its batteries with solar energy during the day, and uses this energy at night to light a built-in lamp. Ana Maia, based in the UK, created the parasol to be used at an outdoor café or a restaurant with exterior tables, but it can be expanded to the garden or camping contexts.

All of these creations can be made reality by DS’ CATIA, ENOVIA and PLM solutions, which are used to conceive everyday objects that help reduce the environmental impacts on our day-to-day living. Philippe Forestier, Executive Vice President Alliances, Marketing & Communications explains, “Because 80% of the product’s environmental impacts are determined during the design phase, the ability to anticipate stands essential. Using 100% digital prototypes, designers can test options and identify solutions that optimize the product’s environmental, technical and cost criteria early on in the creation phase, getting it right the first time.”


The international competition, launched in July 2006 by DS and Core77, a web community for designers, attracted 700 participants. DS awarded the winner and runners-up a total of USD $9,000, plus professional realizations using its 3D modeling software. To see the “Light Objects” competition results, and learn more about Dassault Systèmes and eco design, visit: www.3ds.com/changerdere.